Information

Rizzi DE-537 - History


Rizzi

(DE-537: dp. 1,350; 1. 306'; b. 36'7"; dr. 13'4"; s. 24 k.; epl. 277; a. 2 5", 10 40mrn., 10 20mm., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.); cl. John C. Butler)

Rizzi (DE-~.37) was laid down on 3 November 1943 by the Boston Navy Yard, Boston, Mass.; lalmehed on 7 December 1943; and christened by Mrs. Theresa Rizzi, mother of

Seaman First Class Rizzi at commissioning on 26 June 1945 when Lt. Comdr. E. K. Winn, USNR, assumed command.

Completing shakedown the day following the cessation of World War II hostilities, Rizzi departed Boston after availability and instead of heading for the Pacific, steamed to Norfolk for duty as training ship for student officers of the Destroyer School. Transferred in mid-November, she headed back to New England waters only to receive orders directing her to prepare for inactivation. A visit to New York followed and with the new vear, 1946, she sailed south to Green Cove Springs, Fla., and on 23 January reported to Commander, 16th (inactive) Fleet.

Decommissioned on 18 June 1946, Rizzi remained at Green Cove Springs in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet until ordered activated and assigned to the 3d Naval District as a reserve training ship in January 1951. Recommissioned on 28 March 1951, she proceeded to New York whence she conducted training cruises—weekend and 2-week cruises along the east coast and in the Caribbean, and summer cruises to Europe in 1953 and 1955 and to South American in 1954—for reservists in the New York City area. In November 1957, Rizzi again prepared for inactivation.

Decommissioned 28 February 1958, she remained in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, berthed at Philadelphia, until the spring of 1972. At that time, she was surveyed and found to be unfit for further service. Consequently, Rizzi was stricken from the Navy list 1 August 1972.


This photo of USS Rizzi DE 537 personalized print is exactly as you see it with the matte printed around it. You will have the choice of two print sizes, either 8″x10″ or 11″x14″. The print will be ready for framing, or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing then you can mount it in a larger frame. Your personalized print will look awesome when you frame it.

We PERSONALIZE your print of the USS Rizzi DE 537 with your name, rank and years served and there is NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE for this option. After you place your order you can simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed. For example:

United States Navy Sailor
YOUR NAME HERE
Proudly Served: Your Years Here

This would make a nice gift for yourself or that special Navy veteran you may know, therefore, it would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

The watermark “Great Naval Images” will NOT be on your print.

Media Type Used:

The USS Rizzi DE 537 photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high-resolution printer and should last many years. The unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. Most sailors loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older, the appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience will get stronger. The personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. When you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart.

We have been in business since 2005 and our reputation for having great products and customer satisfaction is indeed exceptional. You will, therefore, enjoy this product guaranteed.


Contents

Rizzi was named in honor of Rosalio Mario Rizzi who was posthumously awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for his heroism during rescue operations for Wasp (CV-7) survivors. The ship was laid down on 3 November 1943 by the Boston Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts launched on 7 December 1943 and christened by Mrs. Theresa Rizzi, mother of Seaman First Class Rizzi at commissioning on 26 June 1945, when Lt. Comdr. E. K. Winn, USNR, assumed command.

World War II [ edit ]

Completing shakedown the day following the cessation of World War II hostilities, Rizzi departed Boston after availability and instead of heading for the Pacific Ocean, steamed to Norfolk, Virginia, for duty as training ship for student officers of the Destroyer School. Transferred in mid-November, she headed back to New England waters only to receive orders directing her to prepare for inactivation. A visit to New York City followed and with the new year, 1946, she sailed south to Green Cove Springs, Florida, and on 23 January reported to Commander, 16th (inactive) Fleet.

Naval Reserve training ship [ edit ]

Decommissioned on 18 June 1946, Rizzi remained at Green Cove Springs in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet until ordered activated and assigned to the 3rd Naval District as a reserve training ship in January 1951. Recommissioned on 28 March 1951, she proceeded to New York whence she conducted training cruises-weekend and 2-week cruises along the U.S. East Coast and in the Caribbean, and summer cruises to Europe in 1953 and 1955 and to South America in 1954 for reservists in the New York City area.

Decommissioning and fate [ edit ]

In November 1957, Rizzi again prepared for inactivation. Decommissioned 28 February 1958, she remained in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, berthed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, until the spring of 1972. At that time, she was surveyed and found to be unfit for further service. Consequently, Rizzi was stricken from the Navy list 1 August 1972. She was sold for scrapping 5 February 1974.


References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .

  • "Everglades". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships . Retrieved January 2, 2007 .
  • "AD-24 Everglades". Service Ship Photo Archive. Archived from the original on April 4, 2005 . Retrieved January 2, 2007 .
  • Melson, Lewis B., CAPT USN (June 1967). "Contact 261". United States Naval Institute Proceedings. Cite journal requires | journal= (help) CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)


Ancient Greek Juan de Fuca - who was he?

Personally, I think the entire narrative (including the video above) was adjusted to the point where we will never know the truth. At the same time, nothing prevents us from conducting a little investigation of our own.

  • The alleged discovery of the Strait of Juan de Fuca happened in 1592.
  • In 1754, 162 years later, the Russian Academy of Science placed the strait on a map and credited de Fuca with its discovery.
    • Wondering why that map was in French language.
    • Juan de Fuca
    • Ioannis Phokas
    • Ivan Phokas
    • Apostolos Valerianos

    Let's get through the known narrative real quick. Ioannis Phokas, better known by the Spanish translation of his name, Juan de Fuca, was a Greek maritime pilot in the service of the King of Spain, Philip II. He is best known for his claim to have explored the Strait of Anián, now known as the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

    • Iákovos, Ioánnis's father, established himself in the village of Valerianos on the island and came to be known as "the Valeriáno Fokás" to distinguish him from his brothers.
    • It was in this village of Valeriáno that Phokás was born in 1536.
    • Little to nothing is known about his life before he entered the service of Spain, some time around 1555.
    • It is possible that Phokás was baptized Apóstolos and later adopted the name Ioánnis/Juan (i.e., John) because Apóstol is not much used as a name in Spanish.
    • Given that Fokás/Fuca was the family name borne by the seafarer's father and grandfather, Valeriános is likely to be a nickname used on the island which would have been quite meaningless in the Spanish Empire.
    • He was a well-traveled seaman, perfecting his skill as a pilot in the Spanish fleet.
    • The King of Spain, he also claimed, recognized him for his excellence and made him pilot of the Spanish navy in the West Indies (a title he held for forty years), but there is no record in Spanish Archives of his name or position or of his visit to the royal court .
    • Before he made his famous trip up the northwest coast of the North American continent, he sailed to China, the Philippines and Mexico.
    • The Strait of Juan de Fuca between the United States of America and Canada was named for him by British Captain Charles Barkley because it was at the same latitude that Juan de Fuca described as the location of the Strait of Anián.
    • The first voyage saw 200 soldiers and three small ships under the overall command of a Spanish captain (with de Fuca as pilot and master) assigned the task of finding the Strait of Anián and fortifying it against the English.
    • This expedition failed when, allegedly due to the captain's malfeasance, the soldiers mutinied and returned home to California.
    • The Strait of Juan de Fuca is in fact at around 48° N, although Fuca's account of sailing into it departs from reality, describing a region far different from what actually existed there.
    • During the voyage, de Fuca also noted a "high pinnacle or spired rock", which may have been Fuca Pillar, a tall, almost rectangular, rock on the western shore of Cape Flattery on the northwestern tip of Washington beside the Strait of Juan de Fuca - although de Fuca noted it being on the other side of the strait .
    • Disappointed again and disgusted with the Spanish, the aging Greek determined to retire to his home in Kefallonia, but was in 1596 convinced by an Englishman, Michael Lok (also spelled as Locke in English and French documents from the period), to offer his services to Spain's archenemy, Queen Elizabeth.
    • Nothing came of Lok and de Fuca's proposals, but it is through Lok's account that the story of Juan de Fuca entered English letters .
    • Several scholars have dismissed Juan de Fuca as entirely fictitious, and the 18th-century British explorer Captain Cook strongly doubted that the strait Fokás claimed to have discovered even existed.
    • With later English exploration and settlement of the area, however, Fokás's claims seemed much more credible.
    • While we may never know the exact truths that lay behind the account published by Lok, it must be considered unlikely that the man himself was fictional.

    • While we may never know the exact truths that lay behind the account published by Lok, it must be considered unlikely that the man himself was fictional.
    • Spain, Portugal, Netherlands, France and England.
    • Juan de Fuca was not mentioned anywhere but in Michael Lok's account
    • Juan de Fuca left no texts he authored
    • The narrative hints that the man himself did exist, but we may never find out the exact truth about his voyages.
    • In the process, he came upon a short-lived Sea of the West.
    • . a broad Inlet of Sea, between 47 and 48 degrees of Latitude.
    • Considering that the Strait of Juan de Fuca is outside of this 69 mile span, our experienced navigator made a total fool of himself. Well, at least according to the PTB.

    • Belief in the sea's existence derived from writings describing two voyages of discovery, one by an Admiral Bartholomew de Fonte, and one by Juan de Fuca.
    • De Fuca's voyage might have happened, but his account is now known to have contained many distortions and confabulations.
    • Admiral de Fonte, on the other hand, is not known to be a historical figure, and the account of his voyage is fiction.
    • Several maps in the early 1700s depicted the sea, but interest and belief in its existence waned until the mid 1700s, when, fairly suddenly, Mer de l'Ouest reappeared on maps and quickly became common for several decades.
    • Juan de Fuca's discovery happened in 1592.
    • Michael Lok informed the world about the Strait of Juan de Fuca (aka an entrance to the Northwest Passage) in 1625.
    • Maps depicting the Sea of the West started getting published in 1750s.
    • Russians (in 1754) were the first ones to put the Strait of Juan de Fuca on a map.
    • Whether based on the de Fuca account or otherwise, a few manuscript maps in the 1600s showed speculative geography that included branches of the Pacific Ocean protruding deeply into the North American continent.
    • One suchmap from the late 1630sheld by the Yale Center for British Art shows such a branch reaching as close as a few hundred miles from the east coast.
      • "Not yet discovered". How ridiculous is that?

      • Apparently inspired by these inventions, Guillaume Delisle drew several maps by hand between 1695 and about 1700 that portray such eastern intrusions of the Pacific Ocean.
      • Joseph Nicholas Delisle, Guillaume's half-brother, printed copies of one of these maps.
      • Guillaume continued drafting and revising his conception of this western sea over decades, but he never published any maps depicting the Sea of the West despite his prolific output of printed maps.
      • A few maps based on Delisle's were produced over the next several decades.

      200 to 300 year long settlement time gap. We do have an official explanation for that, but I do not trust it.

        - 1624
        • New York state - admitted to the Union in 1788
        • Massachusetts - admitted to the Union in 1788
        • Maryland - admitted to the Union in 1788
        • South Carolina - admitted to the Union in 1788
          - 1884, generously - 1845
          • Oregon- admitted to the Union in 1859
          • Washington - admitted to the Union in 1889
          • California - admitted to the Union in 1850
          • 1770s: Seattle, Tsunami, Earthquakes, Lake Washington and Underwater Forests

          Entrance to the Sea of the West

          This is a pure speculation on my part, but if we were to imagine that some things could remain standing in the same spot and were present in both 1592 (de Fuca's discovery) and today, then we would need to take a closer look at this:

          Today, this former "75 - 100 feet above the water" rock looks like this.

          Right next to our former Pillar Rock there is a Pillar Rock Island.

            Juan de Fuca says that he had reached 47 degrees latitude, turned east, and sailed into the straits for many days before returning to Mexico.

          We do have post-1770 maps mentioning de Fuca, and some of them look like this.

          Wanted to briefly mention the "dating" state of things. I have no idea what true dates we might have had at any point in history. For a point of reference purposes, it is convenient to use dates provided by narrative compilers, but that's about it. We have no idea how long ago things really happened, just like we don't know how many years separate certain events marked by the same year.

          Juan de Fuca: the Name

          • Juan de Fuca
          • Ioannis Phokas
          • Ivan Phokas
          • Apostolos Valerianos
          • The Phokas name is rarely mentioned thereafter, until it experienced a revival during the 13th century in the Empire of Nicaea:
            • Theodotos Phokas, the uncle of Theodore I Laskaris (r. 1205–1222), became Megas Doux.
              • The Megas Doux was one of the highest positions in the hierarchy of the later Byzantine Empire, denoting the commander-in-chief of the Byzantine navy.
              • Stratopedarchēs, was a Greek term used with regard to high-ranking military commanders from the 1st century BC on, becoming a proper office in the 10th-century Byzantine Empire.
              • It continued to be employed as a designation, and a proper title, of commanders-in-chief until the 13th century, when the title of megas stratopedarchēs or Grand Stratopedarch appeared.
              • This title was awarded to senior commanders and officials, while the ordinary stratopedarchai were henceforth low-ranking military officials.
              • In Christian churches with episcopal polity, the rank of metropolitan bishop) pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop of a metropolis.
              • Finally, in 1859, an American researcher (Alexander Taylor), with the help of the U.S. Consul (see if you canmake out his name and title) in the Ionian Islands, was able to demonstrate not only that Fokás had lived but also that his family and history were well known on the islands.

                is venerated as a martyr by the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches. His life and legend may have been a fusion of three men with the same name: a Phocas of Antioch, a Phocas the Gardener and Phocas, Bishop of Sinope.
                • Hieromartyr Phocas was born in the city of Sinope. During his adult years he became Bishop of Sinope. At the time of a persecution against Christians under the emperor Trajan (98–117), the governor demanded that the saint renounce Christ. After fierce torture they enclosed St Phocas in a hot bath, where he died a martyr's death in the year 117.

                • John Phokas
                • Little biographical information about Phokas is available.
                  • Pertains to both gentlemen.
                  • Family of Kefallinia claiming a Byzantine origin, though its presence and its (Venetian) title of nobility is not confirmed before the 15th century.
                  • Members of the family served in the Venetian army, participated in the Orlov revolt (1768) and the Greek War of Independence (1821), and assumed various offices in the Ionian state.

                  • It is possible that Phokás was baptized Apóstolos and later adopted the name Ioánnis/Juan (i.e., John) because Apóstol is not much used as a name in Spanish.
                  • Valeriános is likely to be a nickname used on the island which would have been quite meaningless in the Spanish Empire.
                  • Valerianos is a village and a community in the island of Cephalonia, Greece.
                  • In 2011 its population was 154 people.
                  • Valerianos -map
                  • Valerianos - good luck trying to figure out when this village was founded.
                    • I did not find it on any of the older maps.
                    • Older texts did not help out either.
                    • 1.We do not know why he had this name.
                    • 2.The first name of "Apostolos"was given because of some church.
                      • The last name of "Valerianos" was given because of some insignificant village.
                      • 1.An Apostle from Valerianos, Ioannis Phokas, or
                      • 2.An Apostle of Valerianos, Ioannis Phokas
                      • An apostle, in its most literal sense, is an emissary, from Greek ἀπόστολος (apóstolos), literally "one who is sent off".
                      • The purpose of such sending off is usually to convey a message, and thus "messenger" is a common alternative translation other common translations include "ambassador" and "envoy".
                      • Apostle
                      • 1.An ambassador from Valerianos, Ioannis Phokas
                      • 2.An ambassador of Valerianos, Ioannis Phokas
                      • An ambassador of Valerianos, Ioannis Phokas
                      • Ioannis Phokas, a person whose possible coat of arms consisted of a pure crowned Imperial Double-headed Eagle, who could he be an ambassador for?
                      • Valerian was Roman emperor from 253 to spring 260 AD.
                      • He persecuted Christians and was later taken captive by the Persian emperor Shapur I after the Battle of Edessa, becoming the first Roman emperor to be captured as a prisoner of war, causing shock and instability throughout the Roman Empire.
                      • The unprecedented event and the unknown fate of the captured emperor generated a variety of different reactions and "new narratives about the Roman Empire in diverse contexts".
                      • Valerian (emperor)
                      • The PTB History Fabrication Tools
                      • SPQR this & SPQx that. Empires were everywhere.
                      • If you have a better idea, please share your candidate.

                      KD: I don't think we have any idea of who, or what our Juan de Fuca really was. It appears that only his name made it through the censorship of the PTB.


                      2 thoughts on &ldquo Fathers’ Day Remembrance &rdquo

                      My father, Adrian J. Ackerman enlisted in the Navy shortly after Pearl Harbor. After boot camp, he was sent to storekeeper school (he had been a book keeper in civilian life) and then to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts in Washington, DC. After about a year there, he was sent to Plymouth, England as part of a large Navy contingent which established and operated a huge supply depot network which keep Navy units operating. They were bombed nightly (Plymouth was a prime target) and later endured V-1 and V-2 attacks.
                      After the war, he briefly returned to civilian life. He missed the Navy and reenlisted. During the years that followed, he served on USS Rodman (DD-456) and USS Rizzi (DE-537). After a string of assignments at reserve training centers, he went back to sea on the USS Statent Island (AGB-5). His final tour was at MineRon3 in Sasebo Japan. He retired from the Navy in 1963 as an SKC and worked as an accountant until retired.
                      He rarely talked about much of his wartime service. Despite the challenges, he enjoyed his time in Plymouth and returned there in the early 1970s to revisit the places he had seen.
                      Most of the guys he had grown up with served during the war. His best friend was a navigaor in bombers. One of his cousins was one of the Rangers who assaulted Pointe du Hoc on D-Day.
                      Growing up arounnd the Navy certainly influenced my decision to join. Dad always found it funny that I became a Coastie rather then serving in the Navy.

                      My father Frederick Carl Wilder was an Army Infantryman in World War II in the Pacific Theater. He never talked about his experiences and when i asked he would only say it was “hot”. I figured he meant the weather, but after his passing at 91 years old i found some old pictures of him and his platoon and looked like it could have meant the fighting was “hot”!
                      My father-in-law, Foster Gilmore Davis was a Tank Commander in World War II fighting n Europe. He talked a little about his experience when his tanks took enemy fire from the Germans and he was wounded with shrapnel in both legs. The shrapnel stayed in his body until his passing at 98 years old! Our fathers were a part of a tough generation that defended our country and fought for its freedom because it was the right thing to do. They were all heroes and set a great example for all of us.


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                      Product Description

                      USS Rizzi DE 537

                      "Personalized" Canvas Ship Print

                      (Not just a photo or poster but a work of art!)

                      Every sailor loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older his appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience gets stronger. A personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. It shows your pride even if a loved one is no longer with you. Every time you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart (guaranteed) .

                      The image is portrayed on the waters of the ocean or bay with a display of her crest if available. The ships name is printed on the bottom of the print. What a great canvas print to commemorate yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her.

                      The printed picture is exactly as you see it. The canvas size is 8"x10" ready for framing as it is or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing. If you would like a larger picture size (11"x 14") on a 13" X 19" canvas simply purchase this print then prior to payment purchase additional services located in the store category (Home) to the left of this page. This option is an additional $12.00. The prints are made to order. They look awesome when matted and framed.

                      We PERSONALIZE the print with "Name, Rank and/or Years Served" or anything else you would like it to state (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE). It is placed just above the ships photo. After purchasing the print simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed on it. Example:

                      United States Navy Sailor
                      YOUR NAME HERE
                      Proudly Served Sept 1963 - Sept 1967

                      This would make a nice gift and a great addition to any historic military collection. Would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

                      The watermark "Great Naval Images" will NOT be on your print.

                      This photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high resolution printer and should last many years.

                      Because of its unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. The canvas print does not need glass thereby enhancing the appearance of your print, eliminating glare and reducing your overall cost.

                      We guarantee you will not be disappointed with this item or your money back. In addition, We will replace the canvas print unconditionally for FREE if you damage your print. You would only be charged a nominal fee plus shipping and handling.

                      Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these prints have been very satisfied.

                      Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.


                      Grower Website Rizzi Region: italy - piedmont

                      Ernesto Dellapiana is known to say: “I have a crazy love for the earth”. This phrase embodies his life from his birth in Alba, Italy in 1940 through his current stewardship of his family’s nineteeth century estate, Cascina Rizzi, in the Treiso zone of Piedmont. His passion for the land of the Langhe and winemaking drove him to reclaim an historic lost family property named Cascina Boito in 1984, the purchase of the Villa Manzola farm in 1997, and further acres of vineyard land in Treiso, Neive and Neviglie through 2016.

                      Almost directly south of the classic town of Barbaresco lie the classic rolling hills of Treiso, a land steeped in Piedmont history. The Rizzi estate, one of the largest and most interesting in the Barbaresco area, is comprised of 40 total hectares primarily in this famous Trieso zone. From elevations between 200m and 430m, twenty hectares of Nebbiolo produce elegant and sophisticated wines from the vineyard crus Rizzi (from which a Riserva Vigna Boito is also born), Pajoré, Nervo, Manzola, Giacone, and Bricco di Neive. An additional 20 hectares of the estate produce Langhe Nebbiolo, Dolceto D’Alba, Barbera D’Alba and Moscato D’Asti from vineyards in the nearby zone of Neviglie.

                      It is impossible to visit this very special zone of Barbaresco without traversing the impressive, steep, vine-clad hills of Treiso and partaking in the warm hospitality of their peoples. Their protection of this idyllic environment and the validation of the region and its estates are essential guidelines for the continued growth and work of the Rizzi winery and the Dellapiana family.

                      Enrico Dellapiana is the son of Ernesto and, following his older sister Jole, joined the estate after his studies in Viticulture and Oenology from the University of Turin completed in 2004. Enrico strives to make wines that are “alive” clean, pure and not oaky. His creative passions shine through in both his winemaking and artistic sensibilities. As talented a painter as he is a winemaker, Enrico both designs the Barbaresco Rizzi Riserva Boito labels for each vintage and also handpaints each individual label for the limited magnum production of this special wine.

                      Country Italy
                      Region Piedmont
                      Appellation(s) Treiso, Neive, Neviglie
                      Proprietors Enrico Dellapiana
                      Founded 1974
                      Winemaker Enrico Dellapiana
                      Annual Production Between 7,500 to 9,000 9L cases

                      The township of Treiso sits at 410 meters with 35% of their total 1,250 vineyard acreage planted to Nebbiolo. This zone, particularly that known as the Southern Sector, boasts a cooler climate and steeper vineyards than many of the Barbaresco appellation’s towns and is home to the historic vineyard crus of Rizzi, Nervo and Pajoré. Within the cru Rizzi rests the important Vigna Boito, one of only three officially named vineyards in this township. Steep, terraced vineyards, primarily south and southwest facing, are comprised of the white, sandy soils typical of this zone one exception is the hilltop Vigna Boito which showcases more clay soils reminiscent of the Barbaresco zone. The estate’s current vineyard practices include the use of cover crop following objectives outlined by “The Green Experience” designed to guide sustainability and to help produce wines respectful to the traditions of the zone.

                      Reacquired by the family and rebuilt in 1973 with enlarged storerooms, aging and processing facilities. Patriarch Ernesto Dellapiana, considered an innovator in the viticulture field, was amongst the first in the Langhe in 2006 to install a photovoltaic system on the roofs of the farm for the production of electricity to power the estate. The estate went through another modernization in 2014 with the construction of additional storage facilities and a purchase plan increasing their number of cement storage tanks, a preferred resting method for the wines that Enrico feels compliments their aging cellar of 50HL Austrian-produced Slavonian oak barrels.


                      Ean Begg writes in “The Cult of the Black Virgin,”

                      Spokesmen of the Church, when asked to explain the origin of Black Virgins, tend to invoke candle smoke or general exposure to the elements.

                      This could be a believable theory that easily downplays any sense of a deeper meaning. Until we look closer.

                      If candle smoke and the elements were so harsh on the pictures and statues, why didn’t more saints end up black? After centuries of exposure, only the Virgin Mary is dark. And it just so happens that the elements darkened only her skin. The colors of her clothes seem to have withstood all that smoke.

                      According to Begg, the spokesmen of the Church can’t quite defend this theory, though not for the lack of trying.

                      After a time, they would say, as at Einsiedeln, the faithful become accustomed to the sooty image, and the clergy pander to their prejudice by the use of paint where necessary. [However, there is] considerable contrary evidence of clerical antipathy to Black Virgins and disregard for parishioners’ wishes.

                      Even with the little we know about Black Madonnas, we can be certain of one thing. Their existence was intentional.


                      One teacher compares the federal response to two riots

                      The U.S. Capitol insurrection in January was not the first one in American history, said Costa, the Shasta Lake history teacher.

                      The one about three months ago involved a mob attempting to overturn the defeat of former President Trump in the November 2020 election. So far, the FBI has arrested more than 300 and some 500 remain at large.

                      Costa pointed to one other instance of violence against the government. Shays' Rebellion in 1787 was a farmer's uprising in western Massachusetts over taxes.

                      Costa drew parallels between the two events purely on how the federal government responded. Law enforcement agencies in 2021 were able to fully clear the building and its grounds in hours, while the tax revolt of the 1780s lasted months.

                      “With the Capitol insurrection, kids were seeing that our government was able to get people out of the congressional building and our Congress was able to certify that election and move forward. So even making that small connection to what we have is a big deal,” Costa said. “We’re living history.”

                      In his classroom, the culture is built on inclusivity, Costa said. As an educator, he wants to bring in as many viewpoints as possible and foster healthy discussion. Engaging the viewpoints of his students is an effective way of solidifying the lessons they learn, he said.

                      During lessons, Costa said he gives as much detail as he can to eighth-graders.

                      For example, while teaching kids about slavery, he discusses how slaves were tortured and viewed as property, he said. He allows students to see pictures of slaves in bondage and prefaces the class by saying it's OK to feel an emotional response to the crimes committed in history.

                      "It means you're human, we don’t want those voices to be lost. We want to uphold those voices so they didn’t die in vain or have lived a life of bondage in vain" he said.

                      Nada Atieh is a Report For America corps member and education reporter focusing on childhood trauma and the achievement gap for the Redding Record Searchlight. Follow her on Twitter at @nadatieh_RS. Help local journalism thrive by subscribing today!


                      Watch the video: Alec Baldwins Impressions Of The Godfather Cast. CONAN on TBS (December 2021).