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Quirinus ARC-39 - History

Quirinus ARC-39 - History


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Quirinus

(ARC39: dp. 4100; 1. 328'; b. 50'; dr. 14'; s. 12 k.; cpl. 253;
a. 8 40mm.; 8 20mm.; cl. Achelous)

Quirinus (ARIL39), originally LST-1161, was laid down 3 March 1945 by the Chicago Bridge and Iron Co., Seneca, III.; launched 4 June 1945; and placed in reduced commission 15 June 1945.

Following initial commissioning, Quirinus steamed down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, thence proceeded to Baltimore where she decommissioned for the completion of eonversion to a landing craft repair vessel. Commissioned in full 6 November 1945, Lt. Comdr. John B. Darrow in command she completed shakedown in Chesapeake Bay and, on 23 January 1946, got underway for the Caribbean.

On the 29th, she reported to TU 29.6.1 at Guantanamo Bay, and remained there until she returned, briefly, to Norfolk in May. Reassigned to the 8th Fleet (TG 80.7), she anchored in Guantanamo Bay again 18 April. Abbreviated tours there and at Trinidad preceded her return to Norfolk 8 June. She operated as a unit of Boat Pool No. 4 until reporting for duty with the 2nd Task Fleet, 1 February 1947. For the next six weeks, she cruised in the Caribbean, returning to Norfolk 15 March. In late June, she shifted to Charleston to begin inactivation. Offieially becoming a unit of the Florida Group Atlantic Reserve Fleet on the 27th, she decommissioned and was berthed at Green Cove Springs, Fla., until June 1962. She was then transferred on loan, under the Military Assitance Program, to the government of Venezuela. Renamed Guayana (T-18), she serves that country into 1970.


BISHOP QUIRINUS LAY DOWN HIS LIFE FOR CHRIST

In the early fourth century, when Quirinus, bishop of Siscia (in modern Croatia), learned that Maximus, the local magistrate, had ordered his arrest, he fled town. Maximus’s men overtook him and brought him before the magistrate. Maximus asked him why he fled. Quirinus replied that Jesus had ordered his disciples “When they persecute you in one town, fly to the next.”

Maximus’s interest in Quirinus was not arbitrary. Emperor Diocletian, at the instigation of his co-ruler Galerius, had cracked down on Christian leaders throughout the Roman Empire. They hoped that by cutting off Christian leadership the church would crumble. In compliance with the imperial order, Maximus now commanded Quirinus to sacrifice to the Roman gods.

The magistrate threatened torture. Quirinus replied that torture would be more a matter for glory than for grief. And so Maximus had him beaten, promising to make him a priest of Jupiter if he would renounce Christ. But the bishop responded that he was already acting as a priest by offering the sacrifice of suffering to God:

Imprisoned, Quirinus converted some of his guards. So he was sent to Amantius, the nearest governor, who could carry out a sentence of death. Amantius loaded him with chains and exhibited him in towns where crowds mocked and jeered at the old man.

Eventually he brought Quirinus to his (the governor’s) residence at Sabaria (in modern Poland). After reading the transcript of Quirinus’s trial before Maximus, Amantius asked if it was correct. Quirinus said it was. “I have confessed the true God at Siscia, I have never worshiped any other. Him I carry in my heart and no man shall succeed in separating me from Him.”

Amantius ordered the bishop drowned. On this day, 4 June 308 (or 309), executioners tied a stone around Quirinus’s neck and dumped him into the River Raab (known as the Rába today). Quirinus did not sink at once, but preached and prayed as he drifted downstream. His final prayer was,

Christians buried Quirinus. He was mentioned in various old texts and martyr lists, and the Roman Christian poet Prudentius (348–c. 413) wrote a hymn in his honor. Legends said his stone floated until his final prayer and that he sat on it while he preached.


Quirinus ARC-39 - History

Posted on 06/04/2021 4:00:45 PM PDT by Antoninus

June 4th is the anniversary of the martyrdom of Quirinus, Bishop of Siscia, during the Great Persecution of the early 4th century AD. Though he was bishop of the Roman town of Siscia (modern-day Sisak in Croatia) in the province of Pannonia, he was taken to the provincial capital of Sabaria (modern-day Szombathely in Hungary) for trial and execution. Thus, he is especially venerated in both Croatia and Hungary though his remains have found their way to Rome over the centuries.

Unlike many of the Christian martyrs of this time, Quirinus is known from multiple sources including a passio, the 4th century AD Chronicon of Eusebius (as copied and extended by St. Jerome in the 5th century) and a poem by Prudentius in his work known as the Peristephanon written in the last 4th century.

Here is the brief notice taken from Eusebius/Jerome's Chronicon:

The Passio of St. Quirinus is among those collected by Fr. Theodore Ruinart's Acta Primorum Martyrum Sincera et Selecta. It was translated into English and included in Butler's Lives of the Saints and is fairly typical of the authentic Acts of the martyrs which have survived from that time. In it, we see Quirinus debating with his accusers and offering a vigorous defense of his Christianity:

Maximus, chief magistrate of Siscia: “You talk much, and are guilty thereby of delay in executing the commands of our sovereigns: read their divine edicts, and comply with what they enjoin.”

Quirinus: “I make no account of such injunctions, because they are impious and, contrary to God’s commandments, would oblige us his servants to offer sacrifice to imaginary divinities. The God whom I serve is everywhere he is in heaven, on earth, and in the sea. He is above all things, containing everything within himself and by him alone everything subsists.”

Maximus: “Old age has weakened your understanding and you are deluded by idle tales. See, here is incense: offer it to the gods or you will have many affronts to bear, and will suffer a cruel death.”

Quirinus: “That disgrace I account my glory, and that death will purchase me eternal life. I respect only the altar of my God, on which I have offered to him a sacrifice of sweet odor.”

Maximus: “I perceive you are distracted, and that your madness will be the cause of your death. Sacrifice to the gods.”

Quirinus: “No, I do not sacrifice to devils.”

Following this conversation, Quirinus was beaten despite his age. When even this failed to make him abjure his Christianity, he was remanded to prison where he proceeded to convert one of his jailers.

Relief of St. Quirinus from a well on the island of Krk in Croatia.

After three days in prison, Maximus sent Quirinus to the provincial capital of Sabaria to appear before the praeces, Amantius. There, the bishop once again declared his Christian faith publicly during a trial and was sentenced to death by drowning. A millstone was fastened around his neck and he was plunged into a nearby stream, likely the nearby Gyongyos. Prudentius, writing in the late 4th century AD, poetically describes what happened next:

Within the walls of Sisak,
As in a sire’s embrace,
God willed his faithful martyr
Should witness to his grace.
So when the stern Galerius
Oppressed th’ Illyrian sea,
Quirinus there, with sword and prayer,
Won truest victory.

Not by the steel relentless
Not by the fire’s fierce breath
Not by the paw and tooth of beast,
Won he the meed of death.
No matter if by water
No matter if by blood
Death with equal glory
Appears in either flood.
So in the river’s bosom,
Washed by the tender wave
That laid him down, he gained the crown
That marks the martyr’s grave.

They bear him where the Savus
Beneath the bridge runs deep
They tear him from his people—
The shepherd from his sheep.
About his neck they fasten,
That he may surely drown,
O, cruel fate, a millstone great,
To drag him swiftly down.

The whirlpool spreads its circles,
And bears him on its breast:
He and the mighty millstone
Lie there in quiet rest.
But now the martyr bishop,
Who waits the victor’s palm
Feels even death denied him
In this most holy calm:
Death and the sure ascension,
That wellnigh seemed his own
The opening skies to wistful eyes
Th’ Eternal Father’s throne.

“O, Jesus, Lord, all-powerful,”
He cries, “not new to Thee
This triumph o’er the waters,
For Thou canst quell the sea:
Thine own apostle Peter,
Whom Thy right hand did keep,
Unyielding found, as solid ground,
The pathway of the deep.

This stream Thy power proclaimeth,
In bearing up a stone
Grant me this boon, O Christ my God,
To die for Thee alone!”
He praying thus is answered,
And voice and vital flame,
Leaving the mortal body,
Ascend to whence they came:
The stone again is heavy
The water’s tender breast
Yields to his prayer and lays him there,
In sweet and perfect rest.

The above excerpt was taken from I Am a Christian: Authentic Accounts of Christian Martyrdom and Persecution from the Ancient Sources which also contains numerous other accounts of the ancient martyrs and is worth reading if you are interested in this topic.

The remains of St. Quirinus were recovered and later interred within a church built at the gates of Sabaria after the end of the Great Persecution and the advent of Constantine. However, with the decline of the Empire's fortunes over the next century and the repeated barbarian invasions of Pannonia, the relics of St. Quirinus were withdrawn to Rome for safe-keeping. They were deposited, apparently, in the catacomb of Callixtus whence the fresco featured at the top oc this post may be found. Later, the relics of St. Quirinus were moved again to the catacomb of Saint Sebastian where they remain to this day.


🔼 Christians to the rescue

Certain folks had begun to campaign for the reinstitution of a Davidic king, who throughout the Old Testament was called Anointed One, or Messiah in Hebrew and Christ in Greek. These people had probably been active since the fall of the Hasmoneans, but became more so when the kingdom actually stopped to exists, and were most probably known as Christians long before Jesus came to the scene. Because Jesus later explained that not some military man in a fortress was the anointed one, but rather every individual under God (Exodus 19:6, Matthew 23:8-12, 2 Corinthians 1:21, 1 John 2:20, 1 Timothy 6:15), observers began to confuse followers of the Way with Christians, and that's why today we speak erroneously of Christianity.

Some modern critics have noted that Luke ties the birth of Christ simultaneously to historical events that span at least ten years: Herod the Great died in 4 BC and Quirinius became governor of Syria in 6 AD. The suggestion that Luke made an error is beyond the merit of further comment &mdash apart perhaps from noting that the gospels rank among the most complex literary works ever produced, and were produced within a literary tradition that has never been surpassed in skill and scholarship (or even effect).

A more helpful proposal comes with the understanding that in the first century AD, theology was not its own thing and was seamlessly intertwined with politics and scientific pursuits. Today the word Christianity indicates a religion, but if the winds of change had blown slightly different, this same word might today have denoted a political leaning, an art form or perhaps even a scientific discipline.

With the literary character of Jesus Christ, the evangelists explained the life of the historical Jesus of Nazareth as commentary on both the Old Testament and the events of the first centuries before and after Christ &mdash roughly the period from the beginning of the fall of the Republic (from Publius Rutilius Rufus onward) to the translocation of the Sanhedrin from the destroyed Jerusalem to Jabneh and finally Usha of Galilee. That would explain why Jesus' birth spans at least a decade &mdash Jesus' literary character embodies the resistance movement also see our article on the name Pilate &mdash and why he has two separate paternal lines of ancestry one through Solomon (Matthew 1:6) and the other through Nathan (Luke 3:31).


Fanon

Quirrelmort is the StarKid fans favorite ship, which brought a lot of people to making fanarts and fanfictions about them. The ship is less popular in the main Harry Potter fandom. On AO3, it is the most popular ship for the A Very Potter Musical Series - Team StarKid fandom tag, as well as the most popular ship for Quirrell.

The StarKid YouTube channel which contains more than 700,000 subscribers, has all of the parts of the musical and act I part 5 is one of their most watched parts of the musical, which is when Quirrell and Voldemort sing their Iconic song "Different".

In "A Very Potter Musical" which is a parody musical about Harry Potter, Voldemort got inside Quirrell's body and Quirrell hides Voldemort using his turban, which is just like the original Harry Potter books/movies, but in A Very Potter Musical they do other things as watching movies, ice skating and more. but they had difficulties in it because Voldemort is living on Quirrell's back so when they see a movie one of them can watch it and the other can only hear it, so they watch it twice, as they did when they watched the movie "She's all that" when Voldemort could watch it but Quirrell couldn't.

Voldemort's Return

At the end of act I Quirrel and Voldemort trap Harry Potter at a graveyard, then Severus Snape get a cauldron ready to Quirrell and Voldemort to get into, which separated their bodies and they came back to be normal people. This part ended with the song "To Dance Again" where Voldemort dances with his fellow death eaters and with Quirrell.

Voldemort's return to Quirrell

at some point of the musical Quirrell gets sent to Azkaban (The Wizarding jail), and after he heard the Harry Potter killed Voldemort, he starts crying, but then Voldemort comes and visits him as a ghost, and tells him that he doesn't wants to kill Harry Potter anymore, which made Quirrell happy. after their conversation they start running into each other in slow motion and the song "Not Alone Reprise" starts to play, and that's how they end the musical.

A Very Potter Senior Year

A Very Potter Senior Year is one of the sequels to A Very Potter Musical, in the end of this musical you can see that they adopted a girl who's on her first year to Hogwarts, which in canon was supposed to be Bellatrix Lestrange and Voldemort.

Their differences

Quirrell and Voldemort have a lot of differences as the singed at the song "Different", for example Quirrell likes plotting a garden and Voldemort likes plotting to kill, Quirrell thinks sipping tea by the fire is swell and Voldemort thinks pushing people into the fire is much better. The couple has a lot of differences but they still love each other, and that's also what makes the fans love them.


Historical Note Return to Top

On March 3, 1896 Quirinus Breen was born to Evert Breen and Antoinette De Fouw in Orange City Iowa. With his father acting as the pastor of a Christian Reformed church, the ideas of Christianity and the church were prominent in Breen’s adolescence and would later play a key role in Breen’s future studies.

Attending Chicago and Grand Rapids primary schools and later Calvin Preparatory School, Breen would receive his undergraduate degree at Calvin College and then move on to Calvin Theological Seminary. During his time in seminary Breen came into contact with Professor Ralf Janssen who inspired his pursuit of knowledge, introducing him to studies of philosophy and inspiring him to work as an objective secular scholar.

Resigning from the ministry Breen pursued an education in history, attending University of Chicago. With a focus on Church history, Breen received his graduate degree in 1931. At this time Breen began to teach history at Hillsdale College in Michigan, later moving to Albany College in Oregon in 1933. In 1938 Breen was called to University of Oregon where he would serve for the majority of his career.

At the University of Oregon Breen served as the chairman of the social science group. As an instructor, and later a professor, Breen taught courses on Greek, Roman and French history, focusing on the Medieval, Renaissance and Reformation eras.

During this time, Breen was also active in the American Society of the Church, the Renaissance Society of America, Mediaeval Academy of America, American Society for Reformation Research and the American Historical Association. Additionally, Breen acted as a Fulbright Research Scholar at the University of Florence as well as a guest lecturer and various other universities across the United States. Upon his retirement from the University of Oregon in 1964, Breen moved back to Michigan with his wife Helen, and began teaching at Grand Valley State College. Ten years later Breen would pass on in Eugene Oregon, with March 25, 1975 marking the date of his death.

Breen’s work focused on the study of protestant reformers, early renaissance humanist scholars and scholars from the middle ages. Additionally he studied the Church and Christianity in relation to culture, faith and reason. His works include essays published in academic journals such as The Journal of the History of Ideas, The Review of Religion, Church History, Oregon Law Review, and Encounter among others. A book of his work was also published, titled, Christianity and Humanism: Studies in the History of Ideas. Containing a collection of his essays, this work was published in his honor by some of his students and colleagues upon his retirement.

Information obtained from:

Quirinus Breen, Christianity and Humanism: Studies in the History of Ideas (Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1968), v-xvi.

Content Description Return to Top

The collection includes notes and unpublished papers by Quirinus Breen from his time at the University of Oregon (1938-1964). The majority of the collection consists of lecture notes and course descriptions from the history courses he taught at the University of Oregon as well as the course notes for a class in this History of Education at Grand Valley State College.

Also included are compilations of research notes on the study of Marii Nizoii, Christian Classical Literature, Latin works from the reformation era, as well as mixed notes that include works by Franz Hipler, Guiseppi Pagani, Friedrich Lauchert, Harry Hubbell, Bohdan Kieskowski, and Philipp Melanchthon among others.

Additionally the collection contains correspondence from 1952-1965 concerning his work at Colombia University, his work as a Fulbright Scholar in Italy as well as two letters from colleagues. The collection also includes two personal notebooks, containing notes from meetings at the University as well as personal writings.


For France and the Faith, She Was Burned As A Witch

It’s strange, but true. Amid the turmoil and upheaval of the Hundred Years War and the general malaise permeating the French countryside, a singular young girl rose to lead France to a new Golden Age.

THE HOUSE OF ST JOAN: She was born on the feast of the Epiphany, January 6, 1412, in this house in Domremy, to Jacques d’Arc and Isabelle Rommey. She was the youngest of their five children.

JOAN’S FIELD: Joan and her sisters tended the sheep in this field. Though they were illiterate, they received thorough instruction in all domestic tasks.

FAMILY HEARTH: Joan frequently sat by this hearth, where she was particularly skilled in sewing and spinning.

JOAN’S CELESTIAL VOICES: As a girl, Joan was known for her love of prayer and her faithful church attendance, her frequent use of the Sacraments, and her kindness to the sick and poor. She was around fourteen when she first heard her celestial voices, accompanied by a blaze of light, bringing her divine messages. She continued to receive these visions over the next few years. Joan eventually identified her visitors as St. Michael, St. Catherine of Alexandria, and St. Margaret, and they gradually revealed that her mission was to crown Charles as King of France and to defeat the English.

MASSIVE PAINTING BY BASTIEN LE PAGE captures the moment in May 1428, when Joan’s voices became insistent and urgent. Joan traveled to the Dauphin’s residence at Chinon and on March 8, 1429, she was granted an audience. To test her, Charles disguised himself as one of his courtiers, but Joan quickly recognized him and, by a sign known only to them, she convinced Charles of her purpose.

Her Brilliant Military Career

Before his ministers were willing to trust her, they sent Joan to Poitiers to be questioned. After an extensive examination, the panel of theologians affirmed Joan’s integrity and that of her mission. Upon her return to court, Joan and her soldiers rode to the relief of Orléans under a new standard depicting a figure of God the Father, to whom two kneeling angels presented a fleur-de-lis, along with the words, “Jesus Maria.” The French broke through the English line and entered the city on April 29. By May 8, the English fort outside Orléans had been captured, and the siege raised. After several more victories, Joan urged the immediate coronation of the Dauphin. At Rheims, on July 17, 1429, Charles VII was duly crowned, Joan standing proudly behind him with her banner.

After a failed attempt on Paris by the French, both sides signed a truce that lasted the winter. This prevented Joan from taking advantage of the momentum she’d gained at Orléans and her subsequent victories. Throughout the winter, Joan was keen to return to battle and continue her mission.

When hostilities renewed in the spring, she hurried to the relief of Compiègne, besieged by the Burgundians. Her attack on May 23, 1430 failed, and Joan was captured by one of John of Luxembourg’s soldiers and remained in Burgundian custody until autumn.

Betrayed by the King

During Joan’s entire captivity, Charles and his ministers made no effort to secure her release. But the English were keen to exact their revenge on the Maid. So on November 21 the Burgundians accepted a handsome reward and released her to her enemies.

The English charged Joan with being a witch and heretic. On February 21, 1431, she appeared for the first time before an Inquisitional court presided over by Pierre Cauchon, bishop of Beauvais. He was an ambitious man who hoped through English influence to become archbishop of Rouen. The other judges were lawyers and theologians carefully selected by the bishop. Joan was cross-examined as to her revelations, her decision to dress in military attire, her faith, and her willingness to submit to the Church. Though she was alone and without counsel, Joan acquitted herself bravely. Her responses to questions and her conduct throughout the proceedings underscored the veracity of her claims.

Joan was sentenced to burning if she did not confess to being a witch and to lying about hearing voices. She refused to recant, despite being physically exhausted and threatened with torture. She waivered only once, when she was led out into the churchyard of St. Ouen to hear the sentence pronounced. She then returned to prison, but not for long. Either by her own choice or as the result of a trick played by her enemies, Joan resumed dressing in her military clothing. This provided the Court the pretext they needed to condemn Joan as a relapsed heretic and deliver her to the English on Tuesday, May 29, 1431.

The next morning she was led out into the market place of Rouen to be burned at the stake. At the end, Joan requested to see a crucifix and she was heard to call on the name of Jesus.

Twenty-five years later, Pope Callixtus IX ordered a rehearing of the case. Because of new testimony, the trial was pronounced irregular, and Joan was formally rehabilitated as a true and faithful daughter of the Church. She was beatified in 1909 and canonized by Pope Benedict XV in 1919.

Featured image: Statue de Jeanne d’Arc sur la place des Pyramides à Paris. Commettant Daniel Iffla (1889) (11)


EPISODE 39 Joan of Arc (Part 1)

“The life of Joan is such a flagrant beating of the odds that no facts sufficiently explain the course of it. She was born during one of the most corrupt, demoralized periods of French history she is considered a religious and military hero, but she had neither religious nor military training.” —Mary Gordon

By 1429, the heir to the French throne was about to give up and flee in exile. The English and their Burgundian allies controlled huge parts of the country. With Orleans likely to fall in a not too distant future, the path was open for the English to conquer the rest of France. It looked like the game was up for him. As much as he tried, he couldn’t see any logical path to victory. But little did he know that help was on its way—a kind of help that didn’t seem to be logical, reasonable or likely. Help was coming in the form of an illiterate teenage peasant—a female at that—who was going to change his fortunes a young woman who through sheer willpower would radically change the course of the war. She arrived at the royal court during France’s darkest hour with news that God had sent her to lift the siege of Orleans, and make sure the heir to the throne would be crowned King of France.

The young woman was Joan of Arc, and she was one of the most unusual individuals in history.

At 13 years old, her life was turned upside down when she began hearing voices and having visions of angelic figures delivering her messages. The voices told her that no one on earth—neither knight nor king—could restore the kingdom of France. No one could—no one that is… except for her.

Ok, so we have a possibly insane girl hearing voices, This is hardly the stuff that makes the history books. At best, this would be an interesting case study for the history of mental illness. But that’s not what happened here—because the girl and her voices did change the course of the Hundred Years War between France and England. The voices propelled this young woman away from the typical existence of farm girls in the 1400s, and transformed her into a force of nature who embraced a heroic and tragic destiny that was entirely beyond what anyone from her gender, social class, and age could legitimately expect.

According to logic and common sense, none of the things that happened in our story should have been able to happen. A untrained peasant leading an army of knights? A young woman succeeding where the entire French nobility had failed? What she accomplished would have been exceptional if done by an aristocratic, seasoned male leader. But it seems downright impossible for someone like her. The world she lived in was hyper patriarchal and very class conscious, so on the surface there should have been no chance whatsoever that a young peasant girl could pull it off. She belonged to the wrong gender, wrong social class, and wrong age to achieve what she dreamed of. And yet she did.


Quirinus ARC-39 - History

The martyrdom of St. Quirinus of Siscia, June 4, AD 309

Fresco of from the catacombs of St. Callixtus showing, left to right,
the martyrs St. Polycamus, St. Sebastian, and St. Quirinus. Click to enlarge.

June 4th is the anniversary of the martyrdom of Quirinus, Bishop of Siscia, during the Great Persecution of the early 4th century AD. Though he was bishop of the Roman town of Siscia (modern-day Sisak in Croatia) in the province of Pannonia, he was taken to the provincial capital of Sabaria (modern-day Szombathely in Hungary) for trial and execution. Thus, he is especially venerated in both Croatia and Hungary though his remains have found their way to Rome over the centuries.

Unlike many of the Christian martyrs of this time, Quirinus is known from multiple sources including a passio, the 4th century AD Chronicon of Eusebius (as copied and extended by St. Jerome in the 5th century) and a poem by Prudentius in his work known as the Peristephanon written in the last 4th century.

Here is the brief notice taken from Eusebius/Jerome's Chronicon:

Quirinus, bishop of Siscia, is gloriously killed for Christ: for the top of a household quern fastened to his neck, and thrown headlong into a river, he floated for a very long time and while he was being remarked upon by the spectators, lest by his example they should be frightened, hardly praying that he should sink, he obtained it.

The Passio of St. Quirinus is among those collected by Fr. Theodore Ruinart's Acta Primorum Martyrum Sincera et Selecta. It was translated into English and included in Butler's Lives of the Saints and is fairly typical of the authentic Acts of the martyrs which have survived from that time. In it, we see Quirinus debating with his accusers and offering a vigorous defense of his Christianity:

Maximus, chief magistrate of Siscia: “You talk much, and are guilty thereby of delay in executing the commands of our sovereigns: read their divine edicts, and comply with what they enjoin.”

Quirinus: “I make no account of such injunctions, because they are impious and, contrary to God’s commandments, would oblige us his servants to offer sacrifice to imaginary divinities. The God whom I serve is everywhere he is in heaven, on earth, and in the sea. He is above all things, containing everything within himself and by him alone everything subsists.”

Maximus: “Old age has weakened your understanding and you are deluded by idle tales. See, here is incense: offer it to the gods or you will have many affronts to bear, and will suffer a cruel death.”

Quirinus: “That disgrace I account my glory, and that death will purchase me eternal life. I respect only the altar of my God, on which I have offered to him a sacrifice of sweet odor.”

Maximus: “I perceive you are distracted, and that your madness will be the cause of your death. Sacrifice to the gods.”

Quirinus: “No, I do not sacrifice to devils.”

Following this conversation, Quirinus was beaten despite his age. When even this failed to make him abjure his Christianity, he was remanded to prison where he proceeded to convert one of his jailers.

Not by the steel relentless
Not by the fire’s fierce breath
Not by the paw and tooth of beast,
Won he the meed of death.
No matter if by water
No matter if by blood
Death with equal glory
Appears in either flood.
So in the river’s bosom,
Washed by the tender wave
That laid him down, he gained the crown
That marks the martyr’s grave.

They bear him where the Savus
Beneath the bridge runs deep
They tear him from his people—
The shepherd from his sheep.
About his neck they fasten,
That he may surely drown,
O, cruel fate, a millstone great,
To drag him swiftly down.

The whirlpool spreads its circles,
And bears him on its breast:
He and the mighty millstone
Lie there in quiet rest.
But now the martyr bishop,
Who waits the victor’s palm
Feels even death denied him
In this most holy calm:
Death and the sure ascension,
That wellnigh seemed his own
The opening skies to wistful eyes
Th’ Eternal Father’s throne.

“O, Jesus, Lord, all-powerful,”
He cries, “not new to Thee
This triumph o’er the waters,
For Thou canst quell the sea:
Thine own apostle Peter,
Whom Thy right hand did keep,
Unyielding found, as solid ground,
The pathway of the deep.

This stream Thy power proclaimeth,
In bearing up a stone
Grant me this boon, O Christ my God,
To die for Thee alone!”
He praying thus is answered,
And voice and vital flame,
Leaving the mortal body,
Ascend to whence they came:
The stone again is heavy
The water’s tender breast
Yields to his prayer and lays him there,
In sweet and perfect rest.

Click to order a copy.
The above excerpt was taken from I Am a Christian: Authentic Accounts of Christian Martyrdom and Persecution from the Ancient Sources which also contains numerous other accounts of the ancient martyrs and is worth reading if you are interested in this topic.

The remains of St. Quirinus were recovered and later interred within a church built at the gates of Sabaria after the end of the Great Persecution and the advent of Constantine. However, with the decline of the Empire's fortunes over the next century and the repeated barbarian invasions of Pannonia, the relics of St. Quirinus were withdrawn to Rome for safe-keeping. They were deposited, apparently, in the catacomb of Callixtus whence the fresco featured at the top oc this post may be found. Later, the relics of St. Quirinus were moved again to the catacomb of Saint Sebastian where they remain to this day.


Abilities [ edit | edit source ]

Being a Divine Spirit, it would normally be impossible for Romulus-Quirinus to qualify for any Grand Servant class, however, through his connection to mankind and having reached the top of the Lancer Class by meeting high standards in both power and legends, Ώ] he is able to be summoned as a Grand Lancer. Due to his nature as a god, an ordinary Saint Graph couldn't possibly suffice, thus, only with one of the Crown Station itself can he be truly called. Being both a Divine Spirit and possessing a special Saint Graph of a rank above normal Servants, Quirinus stands at the pinnacle of all Heroic Spirits. ΐ] Α] In fact, Romulus-Quirinus is the ultimate god of the Roman mythology, with power equal to the thunderbolt wielded by Zeus, the king of the Greek gods who often calls himself almighty.

When summoned by Chaldea’s summoning system, he has become an ordinary Lancer, but still, there is no doubt that he is an exceptional being.

Skills [ edit | edit source ]

Class Skills [ edit | edit source ]

  • Magic Resistance(A Rank): No information available.
  • Independent Action (B+ Rank): Fundamentally, those who have been bound as a chief god and the highest god can’t exist on the world… But, Romulus-Quirinus has purposely lowered the rank on his own.
  • Divine Core of the Chief God (B+ Rank): Romulus, who is the son of the war god Mars, and became the highest god in the Roman mythology system, Quirinus, after his death, exceptionally possesses a Divine Core in his Saint Graph. Originally it would have a non-standard rank, but in Chaldea’s summoning, it stays at B+ rank.

Personal Skills [ edit | edit source ]

  • Throne of Quirinus (EX Rank): The way of being as the highest god in the mythology system, as the god that rules over the Mediterranean world. It is a skill that has transformed from Imperial Privilege, and would originally display several Authorities, but in this work, it’s fundamentally not used as an Authority.
  • Apotheosis (B Rank): The Natural Body skill that has been transmuted together with the Saint Graph. While Romulus was born as a human, he reached the gods as Quirinus.
  • Nine Lives - Roma (A Rank): A skill due to the constant active self-affecting noble phantasm of Romulus-Quirinus.

Noble Phantasm [ edit | edit source ]

The Noble Phantasms of Romulus-Quirinus are: his main noble phantasm, Per Aspera Ad Astra, and his constant active noble phantasm, Nine Lives - Roma.


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